FAQs Description

Parents who are concerned about vaccine ingredients are often worried about aluminum. People are exposed to aluminum every day through food and cooking utensils. Aluminum-containing vaccines have been used for decades and have been given to more than 1 billion people without problems.

It takes two shots help prevent cancer. The HPV vaccine is given as a series of two shots six to 12 months apart. Doctors recommend that girls and boys get vaccinated against HPV at age 11 or 12, but can be started as early as age 9. The series should be complete by age 13.

HPV vaccination is cancer prevention. By starting prevention at age 11 or 12, you offer the most HPV cancer prevention for your child. HPV is so common that most people will catch it at some point in their lives. Children are vaccinated before they’re exposed to an infection – just like measles or pneumonia.

HPV vaccination is strongly recommended for boys and girls. The vaccine helps prevent infection with the most common types of HPV that can cause cervical, throat, vulvar, vaginal, penile, and anal cancer.

HPV is short for human papillomavirus, a common virus. HPV can cause cancer in men and women. HPV vaccination helps prevent the infections that lead to many HPV cancers.

No. Studies continue to monitor how long the vaccine protects against HPV infections and cancer. Protection has been shown to last more than 10 years with no signs of the protection weakening.

Yes: Try this effective recommendation: Your child needs three vaccines today to protect against meningitis, HPV cancers and pertussis.

Yes. The vaccine has been proven, through numerous studies, to prevent the infections that can cause multiple HPV cancers. In addition, population studies in the U.S. and other countries that have introduced the HPV vaccine have shown a significant reduction in abnormal Pap test results 13,14 and genital warts. 15,16 Sources: 13 Pollock KGJ, Kavanagh

Yes. HPV vaccination is strongly recommended for boys and girls. Vaccination helps protect boys from getting infected with the most common types of HPV that can cause cancers of the throat, penis, and anus.3 Sources: 3 What parents should know about HPV vaccine safety and effectiveness. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/partners/downloads/teens/vaccine-safety.pdf. Published April

Yes. People are vaccinated well before they’re exposed to an infection – just like measles or pneumonia. Similarly, they should be vaccinated before they are exposed to HPV. Vaccinating children at age 11 or 12 offers the most HPV cancer prevention.2 HPV is so common that almost everyone will be exposed at some point in